Thursday, November 20, 2008

Still Very Red


Look at this map. The map shows all 50 states, county-by-county.
Red is Republican. Blue is Democrat.
At first glance you might be thinking you are looking at a map showing the results of the 2000 or the 2004 election. But you're not.
You're looking at a map showing the results of the 2008 presidential election. Red counties voted for John McCain. Blue counties votes for Barack Obama.
Look at it. America is still a red country. It's overwhelmingly red.
There's a message here for Barack Obama: More of America is red than blue. Nearly half the people voted against you, Mr. President-Elect. This is still a center-right country.
Don't forget it.

5 comments:

Glomarization said...

How would you have conducted an election to reflect a county-by-county result? Do you think that every county should have a single vote in the electoral college? That is, should a county of 500 souls, like Petroleum County, Montana, have the same number of votes in the electoral college as Philadelphia County, with a population of over 1.4 million?

Dan Cirucci said...

I'm merely pointing out that across the length and bredth of America our land is way, way more red than it is blue.
Also, not very many parts of the country switched from the last election in 2004 to this one. The switch that did occur was enough to change the final result but hardly earth-shattering.

Glomarization said...

Wide, open tracts of land in sparsely-populated counties is hardly the same as millions of individuals. It's apples and oranges. The "land" doesn't vote; people do.

Dan Cirucci said...

That's the problem with coastal etlites: You've been telling people in those "sparesely populated" areas that they don't count. You've been dismissing them just because they like wide open spaces and live near "open tracts."
But they do count.
And they know that you've been dissing them.
And they will have their say.
And when it happens the elites will be right back where they started - playing with their love beads in lalaland.

Glomarization said...

Huh? They totally count. One vote from someone in Petroleum County counts as many times as one vote from someone in Philadelphia County.